Research links high blood pressure to vascular dementia

Blood pressure

Research conducted by the George Institute for Global Health suggests that high blood pressure could significantly raise the risk of developing vascular dementia.

The medical records of 4.28 million people in the UK were analysed in this 7 year study. Heightened blood pressure was linked to a 62 per cent higher risk of vascular dementia between the ages of 30-50. There was a 26 per cent higher risk at age 51-70.

Blood vessels in the brain are damaged and narrowed over time due to high blood pressure.

Professor Rahimi, deputy director of The George Institute UK, said: “Our results suggest that lowering blood pressure, either by exercise, diet or blood pressure lowering drugs, could reduce the risk of vascular dementia.”

http://www.georgeinstitute.org.uk/media-releases/high-blood-pressure-linked-to-vascular-dementia 

 

 

New website launched providing products and advice for people with dementia

Following his mother’s early onset dementia, James Ashwell has set up the website  Unforgettable.org.

‘Unforgettable’ provides products, advice and a community for people with dementia and memory loss. Products offered for sale include personalised jigsaws, GPS insoles and even the first dementia specific power of attorney (POA) service.

Unforgettable will launch its first pop-up shop in Bournemouth this year and is currently fundraising  for a national advertising campaign.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2016/may/17/unforgettable-improve-lives-dementia-sufferers

Twiddlemitts provide sensory stimulation for people with dementia

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Twiddlemitts are being used to provide sensory stimulation to patients who are experiencing the more advanced stages of dementia.

The benefits of providing sensory stimulation at this point can be enormous. The patients’ mood is improved and positive behaviours are encouraged.

The twiddlemitts can help individuals with dementia to relax and achieve or maintain a state of well-being.

Twiddlemitts, or twiddlemuffs, are handknitted tubes decorated with zips, pendants, beads etc.

Volunteers have set up social groups to make twiddlemitts so they not only provide stimulation for those with dementia, they provide social interaction for a wider range of people.

 

http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/may/07/twiddlemitts-improving-life-for-patients

Picture courtesy of Jane Dickson:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/cluttercup/25666441942/in/photolist-EQcbV3-Ek2CTJ-F74ZXb-FfrvNh-EknzH4-F74dZ5-Ek2FNS-Ekomrx-Ek3hgj-F9m7GZ-EknG2M-bthRaT-bthR9a-bthRat-bthR4v-bthShv-bthRbT-bthR7p-bthS1n-bthReV-bs8bN6-bthR4D-F9kXJt-F9m54H-F757oh-bthSir-bs8bmp-bthRd4-bthR5k-bthRci-bthR5P-bs8e2D-bs8e24-bs8e3n/